The UK has a proud tradition of tolerance of theraputic systems outwith the mainstream. This tolerance has been fostered by recognition that people suffering from long-term illness often require the specialist skills of more than one medical discipline. At the inception of the National Health System the British Homeopathic Hospitals were incorporated.

This monumental decision, ratified by the Faculty of Homeopathy Act 1950, preserved patients rights of access to treatments based on entirely different precepts from those that tend to underpin mechanistic models of illness.

This is an important provision, given the moral right of patients to determine how they wish to be treated and given the risks and downsides to many orthodox treatments. Many of the Hospitals that provided specialist non-conventional treatments prior to the NHS, were built and funded through public subscriptions and charitable trusts.

When the hospitals and their capital assets were given over to the NHS, their resources and work were initially promulgated and honoured by the Trusts. Unfortunately the considerable estates originally developed for homeopathic services were incrementally sold off by their parent trusts or gradually starved of resources, due to conflicting financial interests combined with the disadvantageous power balance in the medical politics of the last half century.

The picture galleries below are historical snapshots from the heyday of some of these institutions - some of which survive as functioning specialist centres and some of which have been razed to the ground.

 

The Glasgow Homeopathic Children's Hospital - Mount Vernon

Glasgow Homeopathic Childrens Hospital
Glasgow Homeopathic Childrens Hospital
Glasgow Homeopathic Hospital for Children
Glasgow Homeopathic Hospital for Children